Enjoy Pennsylvania’s Exciting Theaters | Best Western Hotels

  

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Enjoy World-Class Theater in Pennsylvania

Whether vacationing in Upstate PA, the Great Lake Region, or Philadelphia, Pennsylvania is filled with exciting performance arts and theaters to see during your travels.

Fulton Opera House

Built in 1870, Fulton Opera House is located in the historic section of downtown Lancaster. On your next visit to central Pennsylvania make a trip to Lancaster and check out the historic theater – many locals refer to it as Fulton Theater or, simply, The Fulton.

Named for Lancaster County's steam engine pioneer Robert Fulton, the Fulton Opera House is a League of Regional Theatres class C theater. Throughout the year at Fulton Theater, discover a wealth of stage performances – some are world premiers and others are re-imagined classics. Enjoy the Premier Series Productions, and you'll also want to check out the Family Theatre Series.

From Memorial Day to Labor Day, partake in a Fulton Theatre Tour – informative, fun, and held every Friday in the time frame given. Some of the most notable productions held at The Fulton include A Chorus Line, Singin' in the Rain, and Joseph & The Amazing Technicolor Dreamcoat.

Sight & Sound Theatres

Explore Lancaster County and head for the Sight & Sounds Theatres. Wtih two locations – the other being Branson, MO – Sight & Sound Theatres are faith-based live theatre. The location in Lancaster is one of the largest faith-based theatres in the United States, seeing thousands of patrons visit each year.

Your next trip into central Pennsylvania should be met with sterling displays of acting, set design, and production – all at the Sight & Sounds Theatres.

Visitors from nearby Paradise and Intercourse make frequent trips during the season to enjoy the immersive plays – join the fun and watch the bible seemingly comes to life. One of the trademarks of the Sight & Sound Theatres productions is their willingness to break the fourth wall, often heading into the crowd and allowing guests to become a part of the show.